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Home security inspections

Program Title:

 

Home security inspections

 

Program Blurb:

 

Home security inspections allow citizens to benefit from police expertise in helping them secure their homes. Police representatives visit a home at the owner’s request to conduct a safety audit, based on a checklist. Citizens are then provided booklets suggesting improved safety measures and tips to prevent property crimes.

Assessment:

Is the program based on research?

N

There was no evidence indicating that the program is based on research.

Has the program been independently evaluated?

N

The program has not been independently evaluated by researchers.

Was the program rigorously tested?

N

We were unable to find any information indicating that the program was rigorously tested.

Has the program evaluation been replicated?

N

There is no peer-reviewed study available on the replication/reproduction of the program.

Was the program tested in Canada?

N

Although the program has been implemented in Canada, it has never been independently tested here.

Comments/cautions:

Since there is no empirical evaluation available on the effectiveness of the program, we cannot confirm its effectiveness.

Our expert reviewer had an additional comment: "This program is likely to be part of a wider intervention (not just doing the inspection, but doing it with the aim of residents acting upon at least some of the advice). Because of this, it is correct there is little evaluative evidence on the impact of the home security inspections/surveys. Rather, these inspections are often part of a Neighbourhood Watch Scheme or a target hardening scheme, both of which have of course been evaluated extensively. Therefore officers and organizations thinking about using home security inspections should be clear on what these aim to achieve, and consider the evidence relating to these wider aims as well."

Assessor:

Dr. Hina Kalyal, University of Western Ontario

 

Hina Kalyal is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario. She has recently completed her second PhD with a focus on evidence based policing practices under Prof. Laura Huey’s supervision. Hina also holds a PhD in Business Administration from the National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan. She has served as an Assistant Professor of Management and Organizational Behavior in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and has worked at the Department of Criminology, George Mason University as a Fulbright Postdoctoral Scholar from 2012-13. She is currently the Co-director of the CAN-SEBP Police Management Lab, providing research support to police organizations in Canada for the enhancement of organizational effectiveness.

Reviewer:

Dr. Melanie Flynn, University of Huddersfield

Dr. Flynn is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the Department of Behavioural and Social Sciences at Huddersfield. She is also a member of Huddersfield's Applied Criminology and Policing Centre. Her research interests include: situational crime prevention, the links between crime and the design of premises and everyday places, policing practices and crime analysis, among other topics.

Suggested readings:

Winkel, F.W. (1991). Police, victims, and crime prevention: Some research-based recommendations. The British Journal of Criminology, 31/3: 250-65.

 

Wellsmith, M. & Birks, D. J. (2008). Research on Target: A collaboration between researchers and practitioners for a target hardening scheme. International Review of Law, Computers & Technology, 22/1: 181-9

 

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